Browse Items tagged "crafts" (77 total)

These interesting artifacts were found at a Late Woodland site in Halifax County in the southern Piedmont. They are miniature clay vessels that likely represent child’s toys. The pots show fabric, net, and fingerprint impressions. Artifacts like…

This small four-hole bone whistle or flute was broken in use, which is probably why it ended up in a village trash pit. It is made from a long bone hollowed out in the middle, and was found at a Late Woodland site in Henry County in the southern…

These interesting artifacts from a Late Woodland site in Roanoke County, west-central Virginia, may have been paint stones for body decoration or other purposes. Included are yellow ochre (limonite) and red ochre (hematite), both of which were…

These artifacts found at a Late Woodland site in Halifax County in the southern Piedmont. The bottom object is a bone beamer. Beamers were made by cutting a groove into a long bone to produce two sharp, parallel edges. The tool was then used to…

These bone artifacts were found at a Late Woodland site in Halifax County in the southern Piedmont. They include, from left to right: a lightly ground section for the mandible of a garfish; a needle fashioned from the mandible of a garfish, which…

These ground stone celts, chisel, gorget, and pendants were found at a Late Woodland site in Halifax County in the southern Piedmont. The gorgets and pendants have holes for suspension and are made from chlorite and slate. The two pendants at the…

These grooved axes were collected from a site in Orange County in the northern Piedmont. They are examples of chipped and ground stone technology, the latter of which first appeared during the Late Archaic period but continued through the Early,…

These grooved axes are examples of ground stone technology, which first appeared during the Late Archaic period. This method of tool production involved pecking and grinding the stone down to shape instead of chipping the stone away. Ground stone…

Ground stone technology first appeared during the Late Archaic period, but continued into the Early Woodland period. These ground stone artifacts are from an Early Woodland site in Goochland County, central Virginia. The item in the middle has a…

Bone tools do not often survive at Early Woodland sites. However, it is likely that Early Woodland people used beamers like these ones, found at a Late Woodland site in Halifax County in the southern Piedmont. Beamers were made by cutting a groove…