Browse Items tagged "Early Woodland" (22 total)

This grooved axe was found at a Late Woodland site in Tazewell County in southwestern Virginia. It is an example of ground stone technology, which first appeared during the Late Archaic period. This method of tool production involved pecking and…

Do you notice anything unusual about this reconstructed ceramic vessel? Instead of being flat on the sides, it has nine protruding nodes. This shape exactly matches that of a cymling squash. Archaeologists call this type of vessel an effigy bowl…

Archaeologists have recovered whole or fragmentary antler sets from several sites in northwestern Virginia. Cut marks at the base, where portions of the skull bone are often still attached, as well as the lack of use wear on the tips, suggests that…

Prehistoric Virginia Indians used hammerstones, like these ones found at a site in Orange County in the northern Piedmont, to create stone tools. The rounded sides of a hammerstone were ideal for knocking flakes off of another stone. Archaeologists…

These cache blades were found at a site in Orange County, Virginia. They were partially worked before being cached (stored) together for completion into a more specialized tool when needed. This process allowed a toolmaker to save time when she or…

These grooved axes were collected from a site in Orange County in the northern Piedmont. They are examples of chipped and ground stone technology, the latter of which first appeared during the Late Archaic period but continued through the Early,…

These grooved axes are examples of ground stone technology, which first appeared during the Late Archaic period. This method of tool production involved pecking and grinding the stone down to shape instead of chipping the stone away. Ground stone…

These stone tools, including blades, ground and chipped items, come from an Early Woodland site in Goochland County, central Virginia. Archaeologists can tell stone artifacts apart from regular stone because the artifacts are broken or chipped in…

These stone projectile points are classified as small Savannah River variants that are found as part of the Marcey Creek and Elk Island Phase stylistic traditions. They are from an Early Woodland site in Goochland County, central Virginia.

Ground stone technology first appeared during the Late Archaic period, but continued into the Early Woodland period. These ground stone artifacts are from an Early Woodland site in Goochland County, central Virginia. The item in the middle has a…