Browse Items (33 total)

  • Tags: identity

1906,0509.1.17.jpg
The wife of an Indian weroance, or chief, raises her arms to cover her breasts and crosses her legs in this watercolor painting by John White. Her posture, according to Thomas Hariot, was a "token of maydenlike modestye."Unlike other Indian women…

1906,0509.1.13.jpg
An Indian mother, carrying a water gourd, and her child, carrying what appears to be an English doll, pose in this watercolor by John White, the English artist who in 1585 accompanied a failed colonizing expedition to Roanoke Island in present-day…

1906,0509.1.19
An "aged" Indian wears a full-fringed deerskin mantle in this watercolor by John White, the English artist who in 1585 accompanied a failed colonizing expedition to Roanoke Island in present-day North Carolina. Thomas Hariot, who accompanied White…

1906,0509.1.14.jpg
An Indian priest, or kwiocosukposes in this watercolorbyJohn White, the English artist who in 1585 accompanied a failed colonizing expedition toRoanoke Islandin present-day North Carolina. The hairstyle and rabbit-skin cloak were distinctive in…

Pocahontas-as-Forest-Girl.jpg
In this nineteenth-century oil portrait of Pocahontas, artist Robert Matthew Sully depicts the legendary Virginia Indian before her conversion to Christianity and her marriage to the English colonist John Rolfe. Despite the artist's attempt to…

Pocahontas-in-English-Dress.jpg
Pocahontas wears pearls and a European-style fashionable dress in this mid-nineteenth-century oil painting by Thomas Sully. The legendary Indian is portrayed here at a key moment in her life: after she had begun to assimilate to English culture, but…

Cigar store figurine.jpg
This carved and painted cigar store figure, made around 1870, represents a man in supposed Indian dress. Unlike most cigar store figures of the period, this one depicts a Virginia Indian of the 1600s, wearing a crown of tobacco leaves and a "kilt"…

Rolfe-and-Pocahontas.jpg
This romanticized 1845 oil painting is believed to represent seventeenth-century English colonist John Rolfe and his wife, Pocahontas. Partially dressed in armor, Rolfe has one arm around his Indian bride and his other hand touching the base of a…

What Pocahontas Saw.mp3
Historians Helen Rountree and Camilla Townsend deconstruct and demystify the legend of Pocahontas in this January 14, 2007, radio broadcast of With Good Reason, hosted by Sarah McConnell and produced by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities.

Native Views of Pocahontas.mp3
In this excerpt from "Jamestown: What Pocahontas Saw," an episode of the radio program With Good Reason, Keith Smith, a Nansemond Indian, and Sue Elliott, a Monacan Indian, discuss native views of Jamestown andPocahontas. The program first aired…
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