Browse Items (77 total)

  • Tags: crafts

IMG_009849.jpg
James S. Watson, a backhoe operator, is shown standing beside a hollowed-out cypress log he found while digging utility lines for the Canterbridge subdivision in western Henrico County. Watson and others believed the log may have been an Indian canoe…

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E141B91P09ProceresRoanoack.jpg
A man described as the leader of the Roanoke Indians is depicted from the front and rear in this colored engraving by Theodor de Bry based on a watercolor painting byJohn White. Adding considerable detail to White's eyewitness sketch, de Bry attempts…

E141B91-P14LogCanoe.jpg
Two Indian men are portrayed using fire and shells to dig out a canoe in this colored engraving by Theodor de Bry possibly based on a watercolor painting by John White. The image shows life as it was lived by the Algonquian-speaking Indians in the…

44YO0119,123,124,127,128,144,145,204_grooved_axes_J.H.Taylor_Collection.jpg
These grooved axes were collected from York county on the Coastal Plain. They are examples of chipped and ground stone technology, the latter of which first appeared during the Late Archaic period. This method of tool production involved pecking and…

44KG0009_grooved_axes.JPG
These grooved stone axes come from a site in King George county on the northern Coastal Plain. The smooth axes are examples of ground stone technology, which first appeared during the Late Archaic period. This method of tool production involved…

44AH0193_net_sinkers.jpg
Stone was fashioned to serve many functions that one may not expect. These artifacts, based on the way they were ground and chipped into shape, are thought to have served as net sinkers for catching fish. Though these examples come from a Middle to…

44HA0065_William_Allgood_turtle_carapace_bone_tools_general.jpg
Bone and shell artifacts do not often survive at Early Woodland sites due to long exposure in the highly acidic soil. However, it is likely that Early woodland people used bone and shell artifacts like these ones, found at a Late Woodland site in…

44HA0065_John_Wells_bone_beamers_excavation.jpg
Bone tools do not often survive at Early Woodland sites. However, it is likely that Early Woodland people used beamers like these ones, found at a Late Woodland site in Halifax County in the southern Piedmont. Beamers were made by cutting a groove…

44GO0027_GroundStone.jpg
Ground stone technology first appeared during the Late Archaic period, but continued into the Early Woodland period. These ground stone artifacts are from an Early Woodland site in Goochland County, central Virginia. The item in the middle has a…

PCA_Grooved_Axes.JPG
These grooved axes are examples of ground stone technology, which first appeared during the Late Archaic period. This method of tool production involved pecking and grinding the stone down to shape instead of chipping the stone away. Ground stone…
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